wearable art

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Nick Cave’s Soundsuits bring to mind the lyrics for the title song from the musical Hair, “…knotted, polka dotted, twisted, beaded, braided, powered, flowered and confettied, bangled, tangled, spangled and spaghettied…”

The sculptural, creature-like, wearable art pieces are made from layers of metal, plastic, found objects, textiles, fake fur, beads, twigs and other things that when rubbed together make noise – hence the name Soundsuits. They’re inspired by Cave’s background in textile arts and modern dance.

Currently an exhibit of his work, Meet Me at the Center of the Earth is on display at the Seattle Art Museum through June 5th. Cave discusses his creative inspiration in this short Art in Motion video. His furry monsters even appeared in the September 2010 issue of Vogue showcasing the latest boots and bags.

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Nick Cave

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For more about Cave click here.

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For me, one of the best things about blogging are the tidbits that readers share. Kat O’Sullivan’s upscale, stop-dead-in-your-tracks, recycled elf sweaters and coats was one such tip! (Thanks Pen!)

Design, color and sewing machine wizard O’Sullivan pieces together vintage sweaters into amazing one-of-a-kind wearable art garments. A visit to her etsy shop will make you lust after one of her creations.

She playfully describes her pieces using words like pixie, elf, dream, circus, gypsy, butterfly, festival and rainbow. She describes herself this way, “(I’m) a free-spirited hitchhiking girl who has spent most of her life bumbling about the planet in search of senseless adventure and community. I try to infuse my work with the bohemian spirit in which I live my life. I reckon I have vagabonded through close to 100 countries. I’ve spent years on the festival trail, following the Dead, mermaid parading, moshing, granfallooning, standing on my head in India, and just staring at the campfire. I have hitchhiked to Timbuktu, Kathmandu, Kalamazoo, and pretty close to Xanadu too…”

I’m inspired by Kat to do something with all my old stained, too short, holey sweaters, but I know that whatever I come up with will pale in comparison to her bohemian gypsy couture!

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Katwise Pixie

katwise

katwise coat

katwise faerie

katwise infinity

katwise hat

To see more Knitting inspirations click here.

To become an interactive part of Poppy Gall Design Studio on facebook click here.

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Jolis Paons Telephone book dress

You might also be interested in Recycle Runway

“Like” my Poppy Gall Design facebook page to see what sorts of projects we’re working on and to become an interactive part of the studio. Thank you!

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I couldn’t resist sharing these fantastical (is that a word?) knit and crochet outfits from Japanese design house Everlasting Sprout. While I don’t imagine that I’ll ever in a zillion years wear a dress that appears to be an embellished lampshade, and don’t personally know anyone who would, I admire the unbounded imagination that conceived them. Here’s a smattering of images from previous collections. Enjoy!

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To see more of my knitwear design, click here.

P.S. I have a new ‘Poppy Gall Design’  facebook page. “Like” it to see what sorts of projects I’m working on and to be an interactive part of my design studio.

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Design Inspiration – Cielo Pessione
While searching for design inspiration for a knitwear project, I discovered Italian fiber artist Cielo Pessione.
Distinctive collars and necklaces, hats and bags flow from her knitting needles and crochet hook.
I love the way she interweaves silk, linen, lurex, leather, felt, raffia, buttons, pearls, plastic, glass, crystal, bones, feathers, wood and found objects into her imaginative one-of-a-kind and limited edition accessories and garments.

While searching for design inspiration for a knitwear project, I discovered Italian fiber artist Cielo Pessione and her one-of-a-kind and limited edition wearable art pieces.

Distinctive collars and necklaces, hats and bags flow from Pessione’s knitting needles and crochet hook.

I love the way she interweaves silk, linen, lurex, leather, felt, raffia, buttons, pearls, plastic, glass, crystal, bones, feathers, wood and found objects into her imaginative jewelry and accessories.

medusa orange

medusa orange

wool, silk, mother of pearl

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morning dew

collar morning dew

raw linen, silk, cotton, glass, crystal, african glass, mother of pearl, vintage fabric

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red carousel

collar red carousel

cotton, vintage fabric, plastic, Venetian glass

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bissier

pectoral Bissier

cotton, silk, mother of pearl, shell, vintage fabric

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processionaria

collar Processionaria

wool, felt, vintage button

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coat grey pink

coat gray pink

cotton, vintage fabric, stones

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Masai

reptile Masai

cotton, plastic, stone

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hat

hat Calliactis

silk, polyester, cotton, pearls

To see more knitwear design and my knitwear click here.

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If you’re in the Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport between now and August 2010 you may see Nancy Judd’s Recycle Runway airport exhibit of couture fashions assembled from trash.

The intention of her trashy garments is to capture the public’s attention and inspire people to consider the environment in their daily choices. While fashion is front and center, environmental education is at the heart of Recycle Runway.

Judd, an artist and environmentalist, started Recycle Runway while working as the Recycling Coordinator for the City of Santa Fe. She recognized that art and fashion could be used to raise the environmental consciousness of the public in a fun and positive way. Companies such as Toyota, Coca-Cola, and Target have commissioned her elegant recycled fashion designs.

ConertibleTrashique

Convertible Trashique

This ensemble is made from car parts. The jacket, skirt and blouse are fashioned from convertible soft-tops. The “faux fur” on the jacket lapel is electrical wire. The hat is a front-end mask accented with electrical copper wire. The purse is woven out of electrical wire and metal “paper” that are wound around electrical components. This ensemble took 150 hours to create.

GlassEveningGown

Glass Evening Gown

Approximately 12,000 pieces of crushed glass from the City of Albuquerque Recycling Program were individually glued to a 1930′s style evening gown made from upholstery fabric remnants and a pair of vintage shoes. 400 hours went into creating the dress and shoes.

AluminumDropDress

Aluminum Drop Dress

Post-consumer aluminum cans were hand cut into teardrops and circles and hand sewn onto a 1920′s flapper dress made from an old cloth shower curtain. The Dress and shoes took 200 hours to create.

FanMailDress

Fan Mail Dress

Colorful junk mail (catalogues, solicitations, newspaper ads) were folded into fans and sewn onto a skirt and dress sewn from scrap canvas. The vintage shoes are covered with old postage stamps. This ensemble took 200 hours to assemble.

FauxFurCoat

Faux Fur Coat

Old cassette tapes are woven into the fabric of a thrift store coat; discarded videotape is used to accent the collar and cuffs. The inside is lined with an old thrift store prom dress. It took 310 hours to make this coat.

RustyNailCoctailDress

Rusty Nail Cocktail Dress

Old rusty nails are sewn and glued to a 1950′s style cocktail dress and hat made from canvas remnants. Nails also stud a vintage purse and pair of shoes. 125 hours went into making this outfit.

Recycle Runway collaborates with businesses, non-profits and governmental agencies to promote their environmental stewardship and sustainability programs.

Click here for more information about Recycle Runway.

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Wearable Art – Romanian Shepherd’s Coat
My inspiration for this knit piece came from the traditional long woolen coats worn by shepherds in Romania. I saw many of these in museums while traveling there.
The below-knee length coats are woven from homespun wool, usually the charcoal natural color of the sheep’s fleece. The body is relatively plain.
The yoke is the astounding part of the garment. It is elaborately embroidered with fanciful and colorful motifs; birds, flowers and fruits, and hangs part way down the back. The shepherd was able to pull it up over his head to keep him warm or roll it up and use it as a pillow while sleeping in the high pastures.
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I chose to knit the yoke (rather than weave it) and I intentionally did not add the body, as I wanted to highlight just the yoke. I suppose I could add to it one day…
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The motifs I embroidered are ones that I saw on textiles all over the country. I used the same color palette using yarns that I dyed myself. To see more of my work visit my website www.PoppyGall.com.
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My inspiration for this knit piece came from the traditional long woolen coats worn by shepherds in Romania. I saw many of these in museums while traveling there.

The below-knee length coats are woven from homespun wool, usually the charcoal natural color of the sheep’s fleece. The body is relatively plain.

The yoke is the astounding part of the garment. It is elaborately embroidered with fanciful and colorful motifs; birds, flowers and fruits, and hangs part way down the back. The shepherd was able to pull it up over his head to keep him warm or roll it up and use it as a pillow while sleeping on the ground in the high pastures.

I chose to knit the yoke (rather than weave it) and I intentionally did not add the body, as I wanted to highlight just the yoke. (I suppose I could add to it one day.) The motifs I embroidered are ones that I saw on textiles all over the country. I used a traditional color palette using yarns that I dyed myself.

©Poppy Gall 2010

©Poppy Gall 2010

©Poppy Gall 2010

©Poppy Gall 2010

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