ski art

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From parades on skis, egg hunts in the snow, crazy ski outfits and sunrise church services at the top of the mountain, for me, Easter and skiing have always gone mitten in hand.  I’ve rarely missed being at my local ski area with friends and family on Easter and this year will be no different.

Bored with the pastel hues of Easter decorations I decided I’d bring out this colorfully saturated 1930’s St. Anton poster depicting Hannes Schneider, the legendary ski instructor who made the “Arlberg” ski technique famous, surrounded by a class of playful snow bunnies.

From: The Art of Skiing by Jenny de Gex

Could it be pure coincidence that bunnies, spotted in a shop window in Salzburg last month by AlpineStyle56, bear a close resemblance in color and silhouette to Schneider’s unruly pupils?

photo: ©AlpineStyle56

Happy Easter everyone!

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I’ve been distracted by the bountiful snow I’ve been chasing from east to west and back again over the past few weeks, hence my laxness in blogging.  I promise to share some of my (in)sights from that adventure soon.

Today, my valentine (who shares my passion for winter and skiing) and I will be going on a ski tour, over the meadows and through the woods style, chocolates tucked into our pockets.

This sweet print found here. More of my valentines here.

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I am smitten with this vintage Frosty Treat ice cream cup on ebay. But I just can’t stomach bidding above the current high bid of $9.99 for a paper cup, even if it is unused. So if you’re inclined to make an offer, click here. I’m sure that by next week I’ll be sorry that I didn’t go for it when I had the chance!

frosty treat

To see more vintage ski stuff click here.

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©MartyLinks

WHEE – it’s Christmas! is inscribed inside this sweet card from my vintage card collection by cartoonist Marty Links. Her use of non-traditional holiday colors makes it as fresh today as it was the day it was printed (in the 60′s?).

Have a wonderful Christmas – see you after the holiday madness dies down!

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While I was “home” for Thanksgiving my mom delighted me in sharing a yellowed sketchbook of pen and ink drawings she’d made while touring Europe in 1949/50 after graduating from college.  Between pages of charming sketches of Sienna’s alleyways, views of Lago di Como and Venetian gondolas were scenes from her winter spent ski bumming in Zermatt, Switzerland. As Mom tells her story, her tour came to an abrupt halt; her plans for returning to Paris to study art abandoned when ski season began.

The following winters found her in Aspen, Colorado as the night clerk at the Hotel Jerome. In some of us, the lure of snow supersedes all else, and I guess I’m genetically inclined toward the stuff.  Thankfully I have a mom who passed that gene on and “gets” what the addiction is about. I hope that you enjoy her sketches.

©copyright 2010 Gayle Lee Gall

©copyright 2010 Gayle Lee Gall

©copyright 2010 Gayle Lee Gall

©copyright 2010 Gayle Lee Gall

©copyright 2010 Gayle Lee Gall

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I’m already dreaming about skiing and with any luck there will only be about 50 or so more days until I’ll be back on snow. In anticipation, I’m going to start to blogging again about winter inspirations right now! And I’m gonna begin with a Bang! with skis hand-made by Brianna Morse of Aspen, Colorado. They made my heart leap with joy and envy when I saw them!

Brianna'sSkis

Last year when Brianna was a senior at Aspen High School (she’s now a freshman at Middlebury College) she combined her appreciation of folk art, skills as a woodworker and her love for skiing into a one-of-a-kind pair of skis, as part of an experiential education program. How cool is that!?

Here she explains the process of making her skis:

“Each student had to make their skis from scratch. My skis are a mix of pine and maple and 165 centimeters. I cut the strips of wood, glued them together, and shaped the skis so that the tips would be thinner than the center. I cut strips of fiberglass to go on either side of the wood and P-tex (the stuff on the bottoms of all skis) in the shape of the ski, and then fit the metal edges around the P-tex. I chose a maple veneer for the top sheet, because I wanted the natural wood to show and to give the skis a more authentic feel.“

“Epoxy was used to glue the skis together and then they were put in an air press. After the skis were out of the press I had to cut them, shaping them like the P-tex bottoms, then sand them and give them a final coat of epoxy. I had to do all of these steps by myself.”

“Our teachers had the students design the graphics with computers, but I decided I wanted to try something new. I have a lot of folk art that my Danish grandmother gave me and I like the look of the simple elegance of the folk art style. Coming from the mountains, I decided I wanted to try to bring a real unique mountain feel to my skis. I wanted to make them like something that you would find in the border of a Jan Brett book.“

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“My grandmother’s sister married a German man and one of her daughters learned how to paint folk art. She happened to be visiting us over spring break and was more than happy to teach me the folk art painting technique called baurnmalerei, the peasant painting that originated in Bavaria. It was a little bit of a challenge mastering the strokes and the flowers, but once I decided on a pattern and got painting, it was extremely rewarding to see how my skis were going to turn out.”

“I decided to make telemark skis instead of alpine touring skis because I felt that telemark bindings would look better and more authentic with the paint. It may have been a rash decision as I had never telemarked before in my life and homemade skis may not have been the best way to learn, but I love an adventure.”

“I’m an International Baccalaureate Art student and I exhibited my skis in the IB Student Art show in Aspen and everyone loved them. It was funny though because there were be those who appreciated the painting, and then there were those who came over to flex the skis and inspect my craftsmanship. Either way though my skis got a thumbs up which was awesome!”

Tails

Photos: Pennie Rand

To see more Winter Inspirations click here

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I’m not sure where this piece of vintage ski fabric came from. It’s stitched into what looks like it may have been one of a pair of curtains that probably hung in a family’s A-frame in the 60′s. I can just see the orange shag carpet, the brown couches and the big hanging globe light fixtures hanging from the ceiling. I bet the family played Twister after a day on the slopes! And had fondue for dinner! And the kids probably slid down the trails on stolen cafeteria trays after dark. Ah, the memories!

I’m not sure where this piece of vintage ski fabric came from. It’s stitched into what looks like it may have been half of a pair of curtains that probably hung in a family’s A-frame mountain get-away in the 60′s. I can just see the orange shag carpet, the brown couches and the big globe light fixtures hanging from the ceiling. I bet the family played Twister after a day on the slopes, and had fondue for dinner! And the kids probably slid down the trails on stolen cafeteria trays after dark. Ah, the memories!

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The overall fabric repeat in brash colors…
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Isn’t this skier’s technique classic? I love the big baskets and the Colorado ski promotion.
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Remember when collecting ski patches and sewing them on your parka was the cool thing to do? Some “patches” from some of my favorite ski areas…
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This jump was probably considered pretty outrageous back in the day. No one had even considered the possibility of a terrain park or half pipe yet.
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I still miss those slow old doubles where you could have a private conversation with someone. On second thought, I really like getting in six fast runs on the detachable quad before work!
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Vintage Ski Postcard – Bushwacking Skis
My season pass at the mountain is blacked out on Saturdays so my husband and I often explore – or bushwack – the backcountry around where we live on skis. Mind you, this is eastern backcountry, not the glorious photogenic backcountry of the Wasatch or Bugaboos. I mean backcountry where sometimes the brush is so dense you need to wear goggles to protect your eyes. Backcountry where roots and windfall lurk beneath the innocent looking surface of the snow ready to grab your skis without notice. Backcountry where smooth soft rolling mounds of snow turn out to be gigantic hidden boulders or ice bulges or dens of sleeping bears.
It’s the times that we get into hideous and extreme tangles of brush and saplings that we wish we had “bushwacking” skis like the ones on this postcard – skis with sharp chainsaw blades along the edges. With skis like that you’d be able to pick your line and clear it as you went along – no fuss, no muss.
I love the humor in this card; it speaks to generations of woods skiers. As with many of the vintage ski postcards in my collection I don’t know who the artist is or the year it was published. Anyone have an idea?

My season pass at the mountain is blacked out on Saturdays so my husband and I often explore – or bushwack – the backcountry around where we live on skis. Mind you, this is eastern backcountry, not the glorious photogenic backcountry of the Wasatch or Bugaboos. I mean backcountry where sometimes the brush is so dense you need to wear goggles to protect your eyes. Backcountry where roots and windfall lurk beneath the innocent looking surface of the snow ready to grab your skis without notice. Backcountry where smooth soft rolling mounds of snow turn out to be gigantic hidden boulders or ice bulges or dens of sleeping bears.

It’s the times that we get into hideous and extreme tangles of brush and saplings that we wish we had “bushwacking” skis like the ones on this postcard – skis with sharp chainsaw blades along the edges. With skis like that you’d be able to pick your line and clear it as you went along – no fuss, no muss.

I love the humor in this card; it speaks to generations of woods skiers. As with many of the vintage ski postcards in my collection I don’t know who the artist is or the year it was published. Anyone have any ideas?

BushwackingSkis

Have a nice weekend!

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I was pleased to discover Natalie Vogt’s ski and snowboard art hanging in the Octagon– a warming hut and cafeteria at the top of Mt. Mansfield at Stowe. Her skiers and riders are captured in a state of floating ecstasy – the snow swirls and softly drifts around them in a skier’s dream of powder days. The skiers are both active and graceful.
The way the snow is piled against the trees reminds me of skiing in Goat woods…
I love the way Natalie fills her bodies with spirals – one of my favorite decorative motifs.
Her monochromatic palettes add a dreamlike dimension to her series.
Natalie conveys a sense of steep – could this skier be arcing turns in Profanity?

I was pleased to discover Natalie Vogt’s ski and snowboard art hanging in the Octagon– a warming hut and cafeteria at the top of Mt. Mansfield at Stowe. Her skiers and riders are captured in a state of floating ecstasy – the snow swirls and softly drifts around them in a skier’s dream of powder days. The skiers are both active and graceful.

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The way the snow is piled against the trees reminds me of skiing in Goat woods…

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I love the way Natalie fills her bodies with spirals – one of my favorite decorative motifs.

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Her monochromatic palettes add a dreamlike dimension to her series.

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Natalie conveys a sense of steep – could this skier be arcing turns in Profanity?

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Story and Pictures by Don Freeman

1963 Viking Press

High in the Swiss Alps there once was a Saint Bernard named Hugo who was learning to be a rescue dog. His master Herr Kasser was teaching him to keep a watch over the children in the village ski school. This is the story of Hugo’s first rescue. The illustrations and colors are enchanting and what child or parent can’t resist a children’s book about a  dog with a thermos of hot chocolate hanging from it’s collar?

Cover

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DunbarPear

And the snowbound salmon…

SkiSalmon

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Top of the World – The New Yorker Cover
I wasn’t planning on posting anything today but when I opened my mailbox and saw the cover of the latest The New Yorker magazine, I just had to share it .
The way artist Jan Van Der Veken juxtaposes a stylized vintage ski poster look and digital gizmos makes me smile. This is a familiar scene at any ski area. Skiers with iPhones know they’re worthless while wearing gloves. But those slim cameras fit nicely in your pocket.
I still prefer to get away from it all when I’m skiing, and leave the technology at home – er, except for my latest and lightest ski gear that is!
I’m off now to make a few early morning turns!
http://www.newyorker.com
Jan Van Der Veken, ski art, New Yorker cover, The New Yorker Magazine

I wasn’t planning on posting anything today but when I opened my mailbox and saw the cover of the latest The New Yorker magazine, I wanted to share it with you.

The way artist Jan Van Der Veken juxtaposes a stylized retro ski poster look and digital gizmos makes me smile. This is a familiar scene at any ski area. Skiers with iPhones know they’re worthless while wearing gloves. But those slim cameras do fit nicely in your pocket.

I still prefer to get away from it all while I’m skiing, and leave the technology at home – er, except for my latest and lightest ski gear that is!

I’m off now to make a few early morning turns!

NewYorkerCover

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