ephemeral art

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Finally (!) winter has come to northern Vermont and snow has been on my mind ever since last weekend’s big powdery dump. It’s hard to concentrate on my work when there’s so much fluff to play in. Needless to say, the “Studio Closed – Gone Skiing” sign was hung on my door for most of last week.

Michelle Aldredge, the creator of art blog Gwarlingo also had snow on her mind last week when she posted an article and photos about Simon Beck’s snow art. I’d never heard of Beck, who lives in Les Arcs, France and was immediately smitten with his work.

According to Gwarlingo, Beck is an Oxford educated, self-employed mapmaker. His gigantic snow drawings, which he stomps out with snowshoes, are the size of three soccer fields and take about two days to complete.

The biggest challenge for Beck (besides getting overly tired) is finding a way to reduce the visibility of his own tracks when he begins and finishes a piece. Sometimes, he might work all day only to have his design covered by fresh snow overnight. At other times, he finishes a design right at sunset and doesn’t have enough light remaining to photograph his work properly.

Beck’s geometric snow designs have a textile quality to them and remind me quilts, snowflakes, solar discs, crop circles and ancient symbols.  How DOES he make such perfectly aligned designs on such a large scale? A mapmaker’s sense of place and desire for accuracy must come into play.  I wonder if he finds tromping back and forth, and around and around, filling in his patterns meditative? I think I would!

Visit the Gwarlingo site to see more about Beck and images of his work. There are more photos on Simon Beck ‘s facebook page where these pictures came from. Be prepared to lose yourself, as I did,  for a bit if you venture there!

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The ephemeral quality of Beck’s work is shown here, a short time before it completely dissolved into the lake.

To see more ephemeral snow art on my blog click here

To “Like” Poppy Gall Design Studio on facebook click here. To follow my inspiration board on Pinterest click here.

 

 

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Directed by artist Sonja Hinrichsen, 10 snowshoers deliberately and methodically stomped giant circles and spirals into fresh powder in a wide-open meadow atop Rabbit Ears Pass near Steamboat Springs, Colorado, a couple of weeks ago.

Hinrichsen has been doing similar projects on her own across the country from New York to Aspen, but in Steamboat, she thought the outdoor- and snow-oriented community would be a perfect fit for a collaborative project.

“I always loved those big snow surfaces,” Hinrichsen said about why she began making snow art three years ago. “I thought, ‘I have to do something with this.’ It came out of play, really.”

Hinrichsen said it’s the impermanent nature of the project that intrigues her. She also works in video and performance art, works that interact with the environment around her and leave no lasting impact.

“I’m not so into making art that lasts,” she said. “The world is saturated with manmade projects. I don’t think I need to add more things to the planet.”

To see more ephemeral snow and ice art click here.

Via: Explore Steamboat.com & Steamboat Aerials 

 

 

 

 

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Happy Valentine’s Day! I hope your love lasts longer than a fickle snow heart!

Snow Heart©Poppy Gall 2011

XO ©Poppy Gall 2011

To see more snow art click on my all-time favorite: Snow Spirals or amazing Ephemeral Art on Lake Baikal

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Artist Jim Denevan is in pursuit of the impermanent. From the vanishing curl of a wave to sand briefly stilled between tides, nature’s fleeting moments are his stock-in-trade.

The frozen surface of Siberia’s Lake Baikal presented a shifting, snow-blanketed canvas for Denevan’s specific brand of art: massive geometrical patterns carved into the earth, ever vulnerable to the elements.

These images document Denevan’s quest to create history’s largest work of art, while also illuminating the simple, arresting beauty of the natural world that he so keenly reveres.

Via: the ANTHROPOLOGiST

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To see more ephemeral winter art click here.

To become an interactive part of Poppy Gall Design Studio on facebook click here.

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In frigid northeastern China, the city of Harbin is hosting its 26th annual International Ice and Snow Sculpture Festival. Ice from the nearby Songhua River has been transformed into massive buildings, large scale snow sculptures and ice slides that can be found in several parks around the city. At night, visitors who endure the bitter cold, see the sculptures colorfully illuminated from the inside and out. This year’s festival opened January 5th and will close some time in February.

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Workers shape snow sculptures prior to the Harbin Ice and Snow Festival in Harbin, China. (REUTERS/Sheng Li)

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Visitors pose near giant sculptures made from ice and snow before the opening ceremony of the Harbin International Ice and Snow festival in Harbin in northeastern China on Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2010. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

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People visit tall ice pagodas in Harbin, Heilongjiang province, China. (REUTERS/Sheng Li)

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A woman holds a fox as she waits for tourists to take photos in Harbin, China. (REUTERS/Aly Song)

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Fireworks light up the sky behind an ice sculpture during the 26th Harbin International Ice and Snow Festival, January 5, 2010. (REUTERS/Aly Song)

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A woman slides down an ice slide at a festival in northeastern China’s Heilongjiang province, China. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

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Visitors walk between buildings made from blocks of ice at the Harbin International Ice and Snow festival, Tuesday, Jan. 5, 2010. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

Photos courtesy of

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2010/01/harbin_ice_and_snow_sculpture.html

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Every so often on a beautiful bluebird day after a snowfall, I’ll pass by a field filled with snow spirals. Artist XXXXXX uses fresh powder as her canvas; and into it boot-packs graceful interlinking swirling patterns. They are always a surprise and a pleasure to discover, and are often fleeting as they are quickly erased by wind and snow.
The unknown (to me) artist uses fresh powder as a canvas, and into it boot-packs graceful interlinking swirling patterns.

Every so often on a beautiful bluebird day after a snowfall, I’ll pass by a field filled with snow spirals. Artist Thea Alvin uses fresh powder as a canvas, and into it boot-packs graceful interlinking swirling patterns. They are always a surprise and a pleasure to discover, and are often fleeting as they are quickly erased by wind and snow.

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