design inspiration

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Photo: Jordan Doner -  Courtesy of Avery Marriott

 

These vintage Eame’s chairs, wonderfully and imaginatively collaged by artist Phillip Estlund, would be perfect for my studio!

In Estlund’s own words:

“These chairs were realized, rather fortuitously, while working on a series of collages in my West Palm Beach studio. I often work with imagery from field guides and books containing detailed images from nature. As I was organizing cut out images of flowers I laid them out on several surfaces, including on the seat of my Herman Miller, Eames molded fiberglass chair. The otherwise stark surface became immediately activated in a way that I hadn’t considered and after arranging and adhering the flowers to the seat the result was the Bloom Chair.”

At $3,600 each, I’ll have to let them pass, alas!

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Sold via: Grey Area

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Ten years ago I was obsessed with staying at a Swedish ice hotel. The closest I came was having a shot of Aquavit in an ice cube glass at Quebec City’s ice hotel bar, running my mittened hand over the deerskin blankets that covered the beds and freezing my toes off gawking at the amazing and abundant ice sculptures.

My obsession has shifted to craving a stay in one of the lofty tree houses at the Treehotel in Harads, Sweden in a forest high above the Lule River valley.

Treehotel was inspired by the film ”The Tree Lover” by Jonas Selberg Augustsen. It’s a tale of three men from the city who want to go back to their roots by building a tree house together. “The Tree Lover” is a philosophic story about the significance of trees for us human beings.

Each architect-designed “treeroom”  is unique and was built with minimal environmental impact using eco-friendly materials and energy solutions.

The stunningly, almost invisible “Mirrorcube” is hidden among the trees and camouflaged by reflective glass that reflects its surroundings.

To prevent birds from flying into the mirrored walls, they are clad with infrared film. The color is invisible to humans, but visible to the birds.

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“The Blue Cone”, which actually is red, is based on simplicity and accessibility, both in terms of material and design. Its traditional wooden structure, with three foundations in the ground, gives the sense of height, lightness and stability.

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“The Bird’s Nest” is my favorite. Its exterior is nothing but a gigantic twiggy bird’s nest that disappears into its surroundings. The sleek interior defies Its rustic shell.

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Cast in durable composite material that is both strong and light, “The UFO” is the complete opposite of The Bird’s Nest with its space age sleek shape and porthole windows.

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To access “The Cabin”, a cube-like capsule, one must traverse a horizontal bridge among the trees. There’s a splendid view from its rooftop deck.

The Scandinavian-modern interiors are ingeniously compact and cozy looking and do not give the impression of being too cramped. They even have bathrooms. Treehotel’s website has more photos and nice floor plans for each “treeroom”.

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T.G.I.M.! (Thank goodness it’s Monday!) After a long hard push getting my perennial gardens in order last week I’m ready to be back in my studio today. I’ve been eradicating invasive monsters, weeding, dividing, transplanting and edging in anticipation of the arrival  this week of a dump truck load of composted manure and mulch.

It’s a pleasure each evening to survey my day’s work and see the progress I’ve made. But there’s so much more to do, including planting the vegetable garden now that the danger of frost is hopefully past. So blogging will take a bit of a backseat until I can get the dirt out from underneath my fingernails. In the meantime here are a few garden photos that inspire me – regardless of how far fetched they might be for northern Vermont’s zone 3. Enjoy!

Via: Flickr

via: Karla Akins

Via: John Glover Photography

Via: Christopher Baker Photography

Via: Flickr

Via: Home Design: Martha Stewart

Via: Flickr

Via: John Glover Photography

Via: House to Home 

Via: Georgina Mirphin Garden Design 

Via: Golden Age Gardens

Via: The Complete Kitchen Garden

Via: /0/” target=”_blank”>Steve Messam

Via:  Small Rooms

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Here’s an innovative product that I probably won’t see at the Outdoor Retailer Show this week – snowball making gloves!

Have a nice weekend!

Design: Janet Emmelkamp,Utrecht School of the Arts

To “Like” Poppy Gall Design Studio on facebook  - click here

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Last week, while exploring Reykjavik with tourist map in hand, a point of interest called “The Raven’s Nest” piqued my curiosity. The short blurb on the map read,

“I’m like a raven, I collect things,” Icelandic film director Hrafn Gunnlaugsson says of his seaside hidden abode. The house as Laugarnestangi 65 can easily be mistaken for an eclectic museum or an enormous unfinished sculpture. Like so many artists, Gunnlaugsson has a vision for his anomalous haven – a living, breathing display of history, his travels, family, nature, and above all, recyclable materials. It’s simply not enough to observe, only active participants are allowed in this bizarre existence that Gunnlaugsson calls home.

Impossible to resist this description, we found ourselves bumping down a dirt driveway at the outskirts of town. We were greeted by massive sculptures fashioned from discarded metals, stone and paint. Beyond lay Gunnlaugsson’s low-lying recycled home on the water’s edge – a fascinating and colorful hodge-podge of rusty ship parts, satellite dishes, driftwood, concrete and glass.

We approached the house, and were disappointed to discover that no one was home. As we poked around the periphery of the homestead I hoped that the eccentric homeowner, who certainly must have a sense of humor, would pop out and invite us in for a cup of coffee. So many questions to ask the creator of such an abode!

© Poppy Gall 2011

An all-seeing eye at the end of the driveway made us suspect we’d found the right place

© Poppy Gall 2011

A Viking warrior greets us at the edge of the property

© Poppy Gall 2011

Unfortunately no one was home when we stopped by…

© Poppy Gall 2011

The house is set right on the rocky shoreline – minutes from downtown Reykjavik

© Poppy Gall 2011

I loved all the rusty sculpture. To see more of my infatuation with rust click here and here

© Poppy Gall 2011

A raven, fashioned from what appears to be an old TV antennae

To become an interactive part of Poppy Gall Design Studio on facebook click here.

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My new favorite jacket is one that I designed for Isis for Fall 2010. It has a nice textured water resistant outer shell and a fuzzy lining. It’s a sporty around-town piece that’s cozy like a fleece jacket but a lot warmer. It’s nice to pull the hood up when the wind whips by. The only bummer is when the hood is down it covers the tonal embroidery on the back yoke.

The focal point of the jacket (I also designed a matching vest) is the embroidery, which I based on inspiration from Maori tattoos and carved designs. I have a weakness for spirals in any form. I think it’s because they are satisfying to draw and have symbolic meaning in many cultures. They remind me of growing things. Spirals can either travel in on themselves or unfurl from the center. My spirals are the latter.

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This is the inspiration board I put together for the Bliss Jacket.

BLISSINSP

To see more of my work click here or visit my Poppy Gall Design Studio website.

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When I designed and built my little house I included plans for a lovely porch off the gable end overlooking the field. Time and money have conspired against the porch, and to this day I haven’t mustered the energy or cash to follow through with my original plan. I’d have to move and divide an entire perennial bed; a daunting project. And then the porch fund dwindles every time I want a new pair of skis or go off someplace faraway.

My desire for a porch hasn’t waned, and when I visit with friends who have porches I succumb to what I call “porch envy”. This porch is particularly enviable with it’s eclectic blend of inherited and found furnishings; turned posts, painted wicker, a table made from an old candy-making stove, fanciful wrought iron lighting, a marble cow and terra-cotta and glazed pots of bright begonias and geraniums.

wicker

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red door

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marble cow

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porch

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beatrix

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Today’s post comes thanks to Bikejuju. I’m pressed for time this week with looming deadlines and these works of bicycle art caught my eye!

These awesome bike creations come from Kentucky artist Gaskill. They might or might not be ride-able, but they evoke the Bonneville flats and the open road and a certain American mystique about speed and gears and the DIY spirit that I find incredibly compelling.

GaskillGetLuckyYel_6001

Gaskill_1_6001

Gaskill_2_6001

See more on his blog, Gaskill’s Hop Shop.

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Living National Treasure Serizawa Keisuke (1895–1984) used stencil-dyeing techniques to create irresistible works of art that range from screens and kimonos to book covers and magazine designs. The combination of Serizawa’s originality and vitality with the natural beauty of his materials—cotton, silk, hemp, and other fibers decorated with the brilliant yet warm hues of natural dyes—will make his work a visual feast.
Below are examples of his work shown recently at New York’s  Japan Society.

Serizawa Keisuke (1895–1984) used stencil-dyeing techniques to create irresistible works of art that range from screens and kimonos to book covers and magazine designs. The combination of Serizawa’s originality and vitality with the natural beauty of his materials—cotton, silk, hemp, and other fibers decorated with the brilliant yet warm hues of natural dyes make his work a visual feast.

His work was recently shown at New York’s Japan Society.

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To get my ideas together I often put together a storyboard. When working on quilting designs for the F’09 Isis insulated collection I knew that I wanted the designs to be fluid and playful, yet reflect shapes that would be familiar and resonate with outdoor enthusiasts.

QuiltStudy


The images shown in this inspiration board helped me solidify my design direction for the group. Clockwise from the top left corner I chose images of

1. Cold, hard brushed metal that reminded me of the graceful arcs carved by ice skaters.

2. Ephemeral snow spirals etched into a hillside near my house.

3. A gigantic sculpture of blown glass corkscrews by Dale Chihuly that I saw at the New York Botanical Garden – the intertwining shapes intrigue me.

4. Detail of a mosaic courtyard made from pebbles that I fell in love with in Portofino.

5. Monster icicles about 3” thick, sparkling and dripping in the sun.

6. Haute Route memories: ribbons of perfect powder turns above Monte-Forte near  Verbier.

Once the quilting designs were finalized by the team, I dropped the garment illustrations into the storyboard to confirm the “feel” I was aiming for. For more information about my work please visit www.PoppyGall.com.

F09SourballSlipstream

Final quilting design on Slipstream Jacket

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