Vintage Fashion

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I’ve always liked to mine vintage garments and interpret the designs into something fresh. This is especially true of athletic and sporting apparel. So when long-time cyclist Bill Humphreys published “The Jersey Project” I nabbed a copy for my design library.

The Jersey Project is a visual tour of bike racing in the U.S. and Europe over the past few decades through hundreds of images of club and team cycling jerseys.  Each page is filled with jerseys and bits of racing history. From page one I was hooked as I was swept back into the era when I first discovered bikes and the world of bike racing. I would never have dreamed then that the wool jerseys worn by the U.S. riders I rode hip-to-hip with on training rides would end up in a historical compilation!

I’ve been working on my own jersey design project for a client this summer and this wonderfully rich book has been a source of endless inspiration. (I’ll show my work when I get some decent photos!)

For a sneak peak of my most recent jersey design for Marczyk Wine & Spirits check out Poppy Gall Design Studio on facebook here.

 

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A friend with a shared passion for skiing recently discovered a January 1948 Ski issue of Town & Country magazine in perfect condition in her grandmother’s attic. This delicious edition shares many of the same attributes of today’s magazine, large format pages, beautiful fashion photography, advertisements for luxury fashion, jewelry and destinations, and articles focused on the rich and famous.

The issue is rich with articles about skiing. A many-paged article by Elizabeth Woolsey, a former national ski champion, is devoted to the U.S. Women’s Ski Team  a.k.a. “The Belles of St. Moritz” and their chances for winning Olympic fame in St. Moritz later that winter.

The most exclusive North American ski areas are listed with information about vertical drop, number of trails and lifts, ticket prices etc.

An article devoted on how to get in shape for skiing suggests classes at the New School of Exercise in New York City. Tips on how to avoid injury, which salons offer the best beneficial massages, and how to prevent chapping ones hands and face.

The issue is packed with advertising – including apparel and hard goods brands and ski lodges and even a two-page spread of a painting depicting skiers arcing through untracked snow promoting Chrysler motors. The ads allow us a peak at how glamorous and exciting the sport was sixty odd years ago.

A fashion and gear guide highlights the newest innovations and there is a lovely spread of illustrated après ski styles. I will be sharing this nostalgic skiing gold mine in the weeks to come. Below is a little taste of what’s to follow. I thought it particularly appropriate timing to post these as the the skiwear and ski equipment brands will all be unveiling the latest and greatest for next winter at the  Outdoor Retailer, the SnowSports Industries America and ISPO trade shows within the next couple of weeks. Maybe I’ll see you there!

An ad for Marjorie Benedikter’s ski fashions in the January 1948 issue of Town & Country

“Designed for action, the well-tailored three-piece suit on the left is of water-repellent Forstman wool gabardine in gray, by Irving of Montreal. An added accessory is a smart belt and belt-bag made of pony. Bally Boots. At Saks Fifth Avenue Ski Shop. Marjorie Benedikter, an accomplished skier herself, designs with an eye for the practical. Right: her becoming parka of white Byrd cloth may be worn in or out, and has a convenient drawstring around the face. Navy wool gabardine pants are essentially functional with front fullness achieved by trouser pleats. Dayton Co., Minneapolis; Frederick & Nelson, Seattle”

Saks Fifth Avenue had it’s own ski shop in 1948.

For more vintage ski inspiration click here.

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One thing always leads to another when I’m searching for something on the internet. I get side-tracked and discover things I didn’t even know I wanted to know about! Yesterday I found this amazing ski-themed blouse circa 1957-1960 on the Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising’s blog. It’s just too great not to share. Here’s a bit of ski fashion history cribbed right from their blog.

“Until the 1950s, ski wear consisted of baggy woolen pants and knitted sweaters, topped with a bulky wool overcoat. Though warm and functional, these clothes did nothing to flatter the figure. This changed in 1952 with the introduction of Bogner ski pants. Created by Maria Bogner, member of a German skiwear producing family, “Bogners” were a form-fitting ski pant made of wool and a newly developed nylon fiber called Helanca. By 1955, Bogners were available in a variety of bright colors. Because they displayed the muscular curves of both male and female skiers, Bogners were credited with introducing sex appeal to skiing. According to Ski magazine, “Marilyn Monroe, Ingrid Bergman and the Shah of Iran wore them. Henry Ford ordered 15 pairs. Overnight, skiing had been transformed into a sexy and very visible sport.”

 

“Bogners appeared at the perfect moment, just as North Americans were experiencing unprecedented economic prosperity in the wake of World War II. Many individuals with surplus income turned their attention to the serious pursuit of sporting and leisure activities, such as skiing. Widespread interest in skiing was encouraged by simplifications in ski boots, skis and ski lifts, making it easier for a novice to get both up and down the mountain. At the end of the day, skiers could relax at comfortable resort lodgings, which often included spacious rooms for dining and dancing, along with heated outdoor pools. Skiing was now a fashionable activity, no longer limited to those rugged enough to withstand a cold slog through the snow.”

While the Bogner family might have stolen the limelight, there is historical evidence that in Megeve, a collaboration between skiier Emile Allais and the AAllard family brought about the first ski stretch pants. Armand AAllard was a skilled tailor in Megeve and made custom clothing for both on and off the slopes.  Unlike “Bogner” his was a custom not production affair which is why he likely has taken a backseat to the internationaly known ski brand.

The FIDM Museum ski-themed blouse seen here details the daily activity of a stretch pant clad skier on vacation. As you can see from the silk-screened images, actual skiing occupies only a portion of her day. Her brightly colored ski wear is typical of the late 1950s, when retailers offered ski wear in a variety of fashionable colors and patterns. Many urban department stores featured ski boutiques, and in 1959, at least one fashion writer suggested that ski wear would soon be seen both off and on the slopes. Not surprisingly, the slim silhouette of late 1950s ski wear echoed (or vice-versa) the slim pants then seen in casual sportswear.

For more vintage ski fashion click here or follow my “Vintage Winter” boards on Pinterest.

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Besides thinking it’s a little scary looking, and that it might be hard to breathe while wearing it, I’m at a loss for words regarding the aesthetic of this 1962 ski mask by Emellio Pucci. What do you think about it?

Enjoy your weekend!

For More vintage ski inspiration click here.

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These photos are  jet-setty in a kind of 60′s way! I’m just as fascinated by the compositions, and the play between light and shadow as I am by the skiwear and equipment. Now, wasn’t that James Bond I saw jump out of a helicopter and schuss away?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photographs by Eugene Vernier via Trunk Archive

For more vintage skiing inspiration click here.

 

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These fanciful and dreamlike photos were taken in Paris by photographer Melvin Sokolsky for the March 1963 issue of Harper’s Bazaar magazine. I find the juxtaposition of the modern “bubble” and the striking black and white photography intriguing. Sokolsky is still shooting award-winning photographs today.

Bazaar

© Melvin Sokolsky

© Melvin Sokolsky

© Melvin Sokolsky

© Melvin Sokolsky

© Melvin Sokolsky

© Melvin Sokolsky

© Melvin Sokolsky

© Melvin Sokolsky

© Melvin Sokolsky

The film crew poses with the “bubble”.  Sokolsky’s in the middle next to the model.

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The 1970′s skiwear styles in these  photos, taken at a fashion shoot at Snowbird, Utah,  are both nostalgic and fresh at the same time.  There are a few pieces I’d like to have in my closet today! Sadly, only a few of the brands featured still survive.

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Circa 1972,  Bibs and jacket, both by Henke for Saska Sport Industries. Image © Condé Nast Archive

1972 ©Conde Nast Archive

(Above, left) Circa 1972,  Jacket and bibs, both by Globe of New Hampshire, skis and poles by Hart Ski Company. Image by © Condé Nast Archive

(Above, right) Circa 1972,  Ski jacket and ski pants, both by Bogner, Olympic Timer by Lafayette Watch, and a Glentex cap. Image by © Condé Nast Archive

conde NAst

Circa 1972,  Ski jacket  paired with ski pants and matching cap, all by White Stag; he wears a White Stag striped sweater and sunglasses by Bausch and Lomb. Image by © Condé Nast Archive

1972 ©Conde Nast Archive

(Above, left) Circa 1972,  Ski jacket over warm-up pants, both by Roffe, turtle and crewneck sweaters by Demetre and gloves by Bonnie Cashin for Crescendoe/ Superb gloves,  hat by Brosseau, shoulder bag by La Bagagerie. Image by © Condé Nast Archive

(Above, right) Circa 1972,  Cross-country ski outfit consists of a pullover and matching knickers from Ramah by Bass, Eiger mountain knicker socks, a Pennaco turtleneck, Mohawk ski gloves, and Acme Siren necklace by Donald Stannard.  Image by © Condé Nast Archive

1972 ©Conde Nast Archive

Moon Boots by Technica

Photos via The Selvedge Yard

For more vintage ski fashions click here.

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These wonderful hand-stenciled pochoir print fashion plates are from the January 1914 issue of the French fashion magazine La Gazette Du Bon Ton. I admire how they capture the spirit of the holidays with their colorful simplicity. Perhaps I’ll dress up a little when I trim my tree this year!

The avante guard movements in modern art influenced fashion illustration in the early 20th century and elevated it to art, and La Gazette du Bon Ton led the way by hiring well known artists to help create the magazine’s image. The era of fashion plates came to an end in the 1930’s with the rise of fashion photography.

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The Two Silly Ones

Noel

The Preparations for Christmas

Costumesd'enfants

The Marvelous Tree

If you like this, you might also like this.

Today is the last day to participate in my blog’s 1st Anniversay Give-away. To see more, click here.

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This fashion plate is from my mother’s collection of hand-stenciled pochoir prints from the French fashion magazine La Gazette Du Bon Ton. The sourball yellow rainwear ensemble was featured 90 years ago, but the styling and the colors seem totally current. Personally I’d feel right at home fending off April showers in this “costume pour le yachting”.  I’m especially drawn to the gathered cuffs and asymmetrical front opening.
The model’s body language seems to say “bring it on Mother Nature!” She could hardly dread the storm, being protected as she is by such stylish gear.
The avante guard movements in modern art influenced fashion illustration in the early 20th century and elevated it to art. Look closely at the background detail too- the huge looming yacht above the smaller sailboats in the foreground, the rain clouds and the choppy water.
The era of fashion plates came to an end in the 1930’s with the rise of fashion photography.

The color and styling of this sourball yellow rainwear ensemble was featured 90 years ago in the French fashion magazine La Gazette Du Bon Ton, yet it seems totally current. This 1920 hand-stenciled pochoir print is from my mother’s personal collection of fashion plates.

The model’s body language seems to say “Bring it on Mother Nature!” She could hardly dread the storm, being protected as she is in such stylish gear.  Personally I would feel quite chic fending off April showers in this “costume pour le yachting”. The gathered cuffs and asymmetrical front opening and big buttons are especially appealing to me.

The avante guard movements in modern art influenced fashion illustration in the early 20th century and elevated it to art. Look closely at the background detail – the huge looming yacht above the smaller sailboats in the foreground, the rain clouds and the choppy water.

The era of fashion plates came to an end in the 1930’s with the rise of fashion photography.

Gros Temps
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It is sometimes a surprise to me when I discover that some event, person or opportunity, regardless of how small, has subconsciously molded me into what I am today.  I believe that Frostline kits had a subtle, yet profound, effect (along with a lot of other converging circumstances) on setting my career path toward being an outerwear designer in the Outdoor market.

For those of you who don’t remember back to the DIY craze of the 1960’s and 70’s, Frostline was the major mail order supplier of kits for sewing your own outdoor gear. They offered kits for everything from down garments and sleeping bags to rainwear and packs. The complete kits included durable nylon fabrics, zippers, down, snaps and buckles, webbing and thread, and even a label – plus really good sewing instructions.

My dad, after reading about Frostline in the Whole Earth Catalog, ordered a knapsack kit. With the aid of my mom’s state-of-the-art Singer sewing machine we stitched the pack together. Fueled by our success at constructing the pack, we ordered kits for snow gaiters and then graduated to down vests and jackets.

I remember slipping the pre-filled baggie-like tubes of goose down into the baffles we’d stitched together. My mother’s sewing room became a feather fest as down leaked out before we could stitch the baffles closed.

Authentic outdoor and expedition gear wasn’t readily available in Vermont during the 70’s unless one wanted to drive to Burlington (a 2 hour drive for us) so sewing our own stuff was fun and rewarding, and a lot less expensive than buying it at full price. There was also a lot less concern about brand labels in those days. It certainly made sewing my own everyday clothes less intimidating and I went on to pattern and sew my own cycling and paddling gear through the 90’s. For more about my career path click here.

Frostline kits came from Colorado, a place that held a certain exotic high mountain mystique for me. I’d just discovered my dad’s copies of Maurice Herzog’s Annapurna and Sir John Hunt’s The Conquest of Everest and was captivated by Himalayan expeditions and adventure. I decided then that I wanted to spend my life living and working in the mountains.

I found photos on ebay of some of the Frostline designs – they bring back a flood of memories. If you’d like a full history of Frostline see The History of Gear: Frostline Of Colorado” by Bruce B. Johnson. Frostline is no longer in business.

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As the Snowsports Industries America Show opens in Denver this week to highlight new ski, snowboard and winter sports products and apparel for Winter 2010/11 I thought I’d go back to a time when stretch pants and fuzzy hats were the ultimate in women’s ski apparel.

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Bogner

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Vermont Antique Nordic Ski Race – Photo Essay
3-pinners of all ages came out to participate in the 2.4 km 4th Annual Vermont Antique Nordic Ski Race held yesterday at Trapp Family Lodge in Stowe, Vermont. Nostalgia ruled as long-time Nordic aficionados dusted off their wooden skis and bamboo poles and rummaged in their cedar chests to find their old knickers, wool sweaters and leather mittens.
THE RACE
Vermont Nordic skiing Olympians Larry Damon, Bob Gray (3rd place) and Marc Gilbertson (1st place) peppered the field. Instead of plastic flags marking the course, traditional pine boughs indicated the way. One participant smiled saying that just getting back on her old skis brought back memories of all the fun times she had had in the old days.
The race pic
THE EQUIPMENT
Snapped tips and ripped soles were par for the course. Rule of the race were simple, “show up with 3-pin bindings and bamboo poles.”  The Vermont Ski Museum provided extra equipment.
THE OUTFITS
The Scandinavian influence was alive and well as evidenced by the traditional knit sweaters and wool knickers worn by the skiers.
Insert outfits pic here
This is the Troll binding that influenced the art for my ski poster entry.
Insert ski pic here
This is the winning poster that I designed for the poster contest. For more views of my poster click here.
http://poppygall.com/blog/2009/12/23/antique-nordic-ski-race-poster-contest/

3-pinners of all ages came out to participate in the 2.4 km 4th Annual Vermont Antique Nordic Ski Race held yesterday at Trapp Family Lodge in Stowe, Vermont. Nostalgia ruled as long-time Nordic aficionados dusted off their wooden skis and bamboo poles and rummaged in their cedar chests to find their old knickers, wool sweaters and leather mittens.

The Race

Vermont Nordic skiing Olympians Larry Damon, Bob Gray (3rd place) and Marc Gilbertson (1st place) peppered the field. Instead of plastic flags marking the course, traditional pine boughs indicated the way. One participant smiled saying that just getting back on her old skis brought back wonderful memories of all the fun times she had on skis.

The Race

The Equipment

Snapped tips and ripped soles were par for the course. Rules of the race were simple, “show up with 3-pin bindings and bamboo poles.”  The Vermont Ski Museum provided extra equipment.

The Equipment

The Outfits

The Scandinavian influence was alive and well as evidenced by the traditional knit sweaters and wool knickers worn by the skiers.

The Outfits

This is the type of Troll binding that influenced the art for my ski poster entry.

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Here’s the winning poster that I designed for the poster contest. For more views of my poster click here.

AntiqueRace_2

http://poppygall.com/blog/2009/12/23/antique-nordic-ski-race-poster-contest/

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