Bookshelf

Books I like

I’ve always liked to mine vintage garments and interpret the designs into something fresh. This is especially true of athletic and sporting apparel. So when long-time cyclist Bill Humphreys published “The Jersey Project” I nabbed a copy for my design library.

The Jersey Project is a visual tour of bike racing in the U.S. and Europe over the past few decades through hundreds of images of club and team cycling jerseys.  Each page is filled with jerseys and bits of racing history. From page one I was hooked as I was swept back into the era when I first discovered bikes and the world of bike racing. I would never have dreamed then that the wool jerseys worn by the U.S. riders I rode hip-to-hip with on training rides would end up in a historical compilation!

I’ve been working on my own jersey design project for a client this summer and this wonderfully rich book has been a source of endless inspiration. (I’ll show my work when I get some decent photos!)

For a sneak peak of my most recent jersey design for Marczyk Wine & Spirits check out Poppy Gall Design Studio on facebook here.

 

Share This Post

Tags: , , ,

I was pleased to receive a copy of Fashion Trends: Analysis and Forecasting by Eundeok Kim, Ann Marie Fiore and Hyejeong Kim, in the mail this week and to see one of my trend boards featured and to have my studio mentioned.

The text is designed to introduce undergraduate students to the central concepts of fashion trend analysis and forecasting. The book demonstrates how and why forecasting is vital to successful product and brand development. It covers such topics as the impact of fashion consumption on the environment, economic development, and socio-cultural change, as well as the impact of social responsibility and the digital consumer on current fashion trends.

Here is the original trend board:

Fashion Trends: Analysis and Forecasting is published by Berg Publishers

Share This Post

Tags: , ,

Artist Jillian Tamaki used needle and thread to deliciously illustrate three book covers for the recent debut of the Penguin Threads series. She was commissioned  to stitch covers for Jane Austin’s Emma, Frances Hodgson Burnett’s The Secret Garden and Anna Sewell’s Black Beauty. Each is beautifully rendered, her stitches are perfect, the color selection impeccable. The covers are sculpt-embossed for a textured feel. With a resurgence of handmade and homespun goods in the marketplace (think etsy.com, craft fairs and farmer’s markets), it is nothing short of genius to update the classics for a new generation of readers by “embroidering” their covers. Do you know a young reader who would delight in these editions? Find the series at your favorite local bookseller.

Jillian Tamaki’s blog shows her work in progress and more about the project.

The inside flap is a truly inspired! The back of Tamaki’s canvas shows her neat stitches.

Share This Post

Tags: , ,

Color-Natural Hist

Victoria Finlay’s Color: A Natural History of the Palette is a great summer read for armchair travelers and color enthusiasts alike. It transports the reader to remote places around the globe via a rainbow of adventures as the author intrepidly searches for the origins of natural pigments and dyes.

Finlay was obsessed with color as a child and when her father took her to Chartres cathedral and told her that people were no longer able to make the blue in the stained glass she decided it was time to find out the secret of that particular blue and other secrets of color.

In Chile Finlay discovers how Carmine Red is made from the blood of cochineal beetles. In India she tracks down an old legend that claims Indian Yellow comes from the urine of cows whose diet is comprised exclusively of mangoes. She looks into the deadly Schlee’s Green, which may have been the cause of Napolean’s death. In Taliban occupied Afghanistan she visits the Sar-e-Sang mine to see for herself the prized and bluest lapis on earth – a color that when combined with oils renders the perfect hue for the Virgin Mary’s robes and heaven. From her we learn the secrets of the incomparable blood red varnish Stradivarius used to finish his violins; that mommia or “mummy” is a brown pigment made from the remains of Egyptian mummies; how saffron is harvested in Spain and why red ocher is sacred among Australian Aborigines.

Color is broken down by chapters titled – ocher, black, brown, white, red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet – and each is a vivid travelogue filled with fables, facts and anecdotes about the history and science of the colors found in the spectrum.

Finlay’s travel experiences are honestly told and are equally as interesting as her natural history observations and discoveries. I’ll never look at color the same way after reading her book.

Available at your local bookseller

Share This Post

Tags:

I was saddened to learn of the passing of Adirondack legend and staunch environmentalist Anne LaBastille on July 1st at the age of 75.

I was introduced to LaBastille through her 1976 autobiographical book, Woodswoman. In it she relates her experiences of building her own cabin at the northeast end of Twitchell Lake, near Big Moose Lake in New York’s Adirondack mountains. She chronicles the trials and tribulations of living self sufficiently – and alone – in a remote place with honesty, as her chosen lifestyle was often physically and emotionally difficult. On leaving her marriage and building her cabin, she writes that she came to the Adirondacks to “sit in my cabin as in a cocoon, sheltered by the swaying spruces from the outside world.”

Her writing sparked my imagination and fueled my belief that anything is possible, and that women doing “men’s work” does not mean they’ve lost their femininity. Her stories inspire independence in the outdoors as well as in all aspects of life. Because of her courage I realized I did not have much to fear in the woods if I was sensible and prepared and consequently have spent plenty of time confidently tramping around solo in the Adirondack mountains. Living alone in a cabin without running water or electricity has been a decades-long dream for me – perhaps hatched when I first read Woodswoman.

In an obituary this week, long time Adirondack guide and outdoors writer Joe Hackett described LaBastille:

“Following the publication [of Woodswoman], LaBastille became an instant role model for thousands of young women all across the country. Her story offered evidence that a lonely life in the forest can foster great confidence.

”Her story proved to be an inspiration for a generation of female outdoor enthusiasts, and it empowered them to be more independent and self-reliant in their enjoyment of the outdoors. 
”In the process of paddling, hiking and camping throughout the Adirondacks, she became an icon of the mountains she wandered. Undoubtedly she cultivated her image, and it didn’t hurt matters that she had blonde hair, a fit figure, a bright smile and a tangible sense of independence. She exuded an air of confidence, and whether she was walking into a diner or paddling across a pond, her presence turned heads. She recognized it and enjoyed it.”

Although I’ve re-read Woodswoman a number of times – and will again, I’ve never read her other books about life on “Big Bear Lake”. I now feel the urge to visit the library and check out Beyond Black Bear Lake (1987), Woodswoman III (1997) and Woodswoman IIII (2003).

woodswoman

Share This Post

Tags: ,

Color is life; for a world without color appears to us as dead. Colors are primordial ideas, the children of light. —Johannes Itten

Johannes Itten’s The Color Star is one of my favorite tools for playing around with color. I’ve used it for projects ranging from merchandising apparel collections to coloring print and knit designs to planning garden color schemes.

x

Color_Star

The Color Star is based on Itten’s theory of colors found in The Art of Color. The twelve pointed star is made up of the primary colors of yellow, red and blue, secondary colors of orange, violet and green and six intermediate colors.  Colors radiate from the center of the star to the points – white being at the center and black at the tips. It is arranged so that complementary colors face each other.

The star is printed on sturdy cardboard. Accompanying cut-out disks mask various points of the star help visualize forty-nine different harmonic color combinations. One can selectively examine the relationships of primary, secondary and tertiary colors by placing different disks on the star. With this method, warm and cool values, complementary colors, and different hues and intensities can be compared individually.

While The Color Star doesn’t replace having a good color eye, it is fun tool to challenge one’s color perceptions and provide color inspiration.

IMG_4330

IMG_4332

To see more color inspiration click here.

x

Share This Post

Tags: ,

“One can never be bored by powder skiing because it is a special gift of the relationship between earth and sky. It only comes in significant amounts in particular places, at certain times on this earth; it lasts only a limited amount of time before sun or wind changes it. People devote their lives to it “for the pleasure of being so purely played” by gravity and snow.”

This quote by Dolores LaChapelle, one of powder skiing’s pioneers, is from her book Deep Powder Snow; 40 Years of Ecstatic Skiing, Avalanches, and Earth Wisdom. Dolores was reigning queen of Alta powder back in the days when the only lodges there were the Rustler and the Alta, and cars parked along the road.

Deep Powder Snow chronicles her skiing life before and after Alta, personal trials and epiphanies, her special relationship with snow and gravity and is laced with her philosophy of Deep Ecology. It’s a wonderfully thoughtful quick read.

I’m on my way to Alta right now and hoping for fresh powder. Dolores’ little book is tucked in my pack.

DeepPowderSnow

To become an interactive part of Poppy Gall Design Studio on facebook click here.

x

Share This Post

Tags: ,

1-Cover

Ollie’s Ski Trip, by Elsa Beskow, first published in Sweden in 1907, is the story of six-year old Ollie who receives a pair of skis for his birthday.

2-1stpage

He anxiously awaits the first snowfall, and when it finally arrives, he sets off by himself and has all kinds of adventures.

3-JackFrost&Thaw

In the forest he meets Jack Frost who chases away Mrs. Thaw before she can make a mess of winter…

4-KingWinter'sPalace

Ollie is introduced to King Winter and then tours his palace…

5-Workshop

There Ollie visits a workshop where boys are making skis, toboggans and skates…

6-ReindeerRide

When it was time to leave his new friends at the palace, Jack Frost harnesses a reindeer and skijors Ollie home…

It’s a very sweet book and I haven’t given the whole story away here. It would make a lovely gift for a young skier. Beskow weaves the special qualities of living in a wintery northern climate into her story and illustrations. It’s no wonder Ollie’s Ski Trip is still in print after one hundred years!

If you like this post you might also like Ski Pup.

There are still a few more days to participate in my blog’s 1st Anniversay Give-Away. Click here to learn more.

x

Share This Post

Tags: , ,

Book Review – Bike Snob; Systematically & Mercilessly Realigning The World Of Cycling
In my family it’s acceptable to read books before you give them as gifts, but last minute planning on my part made it impossible for me to read blogger Eben Weiss’ new book “Bike Snob; Systematically & Mercilessly Realigning The World Of Cycling” before wrapping it and giving it to my husband for his birthday. I finally wrested it out of his hands and have read it myself.
This crazy little hardback volume (has the heft of an old-time Latin primer) lampoons roadies and messengers, urban cyclists and triathletes, cyclocrossers and mountain bikers. No cycling discipline is sacred in Weiss’, more widely known as the Bike Snob, view. His witty anecdotal tales are interspersed with fantastic illustrations by Christopher Koelle.
http://www.bikejuju.com/2010/chris-koelle-profile-bike-snob/
Tackling a variety of subjects ranging from “Fear, And How to Survive on A Bike” to “Rules vs. Fashion” and “What is a Cyclist and Why Would Anyone Want to Be One?” The Bike Snob intersperses his chapters with tales of his personal and humorous experiences.
I learned about the urban and messenger bike cultures in New York City, The Bike Snob’s home turf. As a country gal, this was an amusing eye-opener for me and made me better understand what’s behind all those bikes without brakes that I see when I’m in Manhattan. Bike Snob thinks that brakes are good and that messenger bags are stupid. (I thought I was alone here!)
The chapter “A Brief Guide to Etiquette For Non-Cyclists” with sub-chapters such as “Let Bikes Inside”, “Don’t Ask Us If We’re Going To Ride in The Tour de France” and “Don’t Mention Impotence”, tackles subjects that other cycling books don’t go near.
What I really like about this little book is that it captures the essence of why cyclists love to ride their bikes and that once you pare away the superfluous (equipment, clothing, attitude) it’s all about the joy of riding your bike. It will make you laugh out loud.
Visit BikeSnobNYC for your daily dose of sharp-witted cycling commentary.
http://bikesnobnyc.blogspot.com/

In my family it’s acceptable to read books before you give them as gifts, but last minute planning on my part made it impossible for me to read blogger Eben Weiss’ new book “Bike Snob; Systematically & Mercilessly Realigning The World Of Cycling” before wrapping it and giving it to my husband for his birthday. I finally wrested it out of his hands and have read it myself.

IMG_3319

This crazy little hardback volume (has the heft of an old-time Latin primer) lampoons roadies and messengers, urban cyclists and triathletes, cyclocrossers and mountain bikers. No cycling discipline is sacred in Weiss’ (more widely known as the Bike Snob) view. His witty anecdotal tales are interspersed with fantastic illustrations by Christopher Koelle.

IMG_3320

Tackling a variety of subjects ranging from “Fear, And How to Survive On A Bike” to “Rules vs. Fashion” and “What Is A Cyclist and Why Would Anyone Want to Be One?”, the Bike Snob intersperses his chapters with tales of his personal and humorous experiences.

IMG_3322

I learned about the urban and messenger bike cultures in New York City, The Bike Snob’s home turf. As a country gal, this was an amusing eye-opener for me and made me better understand what’s behind all those brakeless bikes that I see when I’m in Manhattan. Bike Snob thinks that brakes are good and that messenger bags are stupid. (I thought I was alone here!)

IMG_3321

The chapter “A Brief Guide to Etiquette For Non-Cyclists” with sub-chapters such as “Let Bikes Inside”, “Don’t Ask Us If We’re Going To Ride in The Tour de France” and “Don’t Mention Impotence”, tackles subjects that other cycling books don’t go near.

IMG_3323

What I really like about this little book is that it captures the essence of why cyclists love to ride their bikes and that once you pare away the superfluous (equipment, clothing, attitude) it’s all about the joy of riding your bike. It will make you laugh out loud.

Visit BikeSnobNYC for your daily dose of sharp-witted cycling commentary.

IMG_3324

Thanks to Bikejuju for turning me on to BikeSnobNYC!

“Like” my Poppy Gall Design facebook page to see what sorts of projects we’re working on and to become an interactive part of the studio.

x

Share This Post

Tags: , ,

Who can’t resist the silly songs and the cheerful and colorful illustrations in the 1964 children’s book “Bicycle Songs of Safety” written by Jill and Lawrence Grossman and illustrated by Herb McClure? (Holt, Rinehart & Winston) It takes you back to a time when kids actually rode bikes around town and there was respect for bicyclists. Below are some excerpts; good advice for any age.

x

NightRide

x

“Keep to the Right!” I’m always amazed when I see kids AND adults pedaling against traffic! Besides being dangerous it must be pretty scary to have cars coming at you while riding.

NightRide

keep2right

x

“When You Ride at Night”

When you ride at night,

you will be alright,

with a rear danger signal and a front white light.

And to be extra safe,

be sure to wear clothes that are white,

at night!

x

NightRide

“Never Carry Big Things”

Never carry great big things when you’re on your bike.

Great big things are hard to carry,

that means things like:

people, packages, penguins, polar bears, pumpkins, pandas and such!

You won’t be able to see a thing,

and they weigh too much!

I don’t think this song would be a top hit in Asia!

NightRide

x

NightRide

“Do Not Swerve or Weave in Traffic”

Do not swerve from side to side.

Do not weave in and out of traffic.

Let a straight line be your guide and you will be

terrific, terrific, terrific!

You will be terrific in traffic!

x

If you like this post, you might also like this.

P.S. I have a new facebook page. Become a fan and be an interactive part of my design studio.

x

Share This Post

Tags: , , ,

Story and Pictures by Don Freeman

1963 Viking Press

High in the Swiss Alps there once was a Saint Bernard named Hugo who was learning to be a rescue dog. His master Herr Kasser was teaching him to keep a watch over the children in the village ski school. This is the story of Hugo’s first rescue. The illustrations and colors are enchanting and what child or parent can’t resist a children’s book about a  dog with a thermos of hot chocolate hanging from it’s collar?

Cover

x

Page5

x

Page8

x

Page15

x

Page54

Share This Post

Tags: , , ,

Today I am sharing with you a book that has inspired my love of alpine experiences and environments  “La Haute-Route; Chamonix-Zermatt-SaasFee”. It’s a book of text and photographs by acclaimed Swiss mountaineer, Himalayan expedition veteran and avalanche expert André Roch. The Haute Route is a high alpine traverse that meanders through the Alps and valleys “starting” in the French village of Chamonix and linking with Zermatt and Saas-Fee Switzerland. Usually tackled in the spring on skis when the snow is stable, the route has many route variations and takes about five days to complete with a guide.

Cover

This book has been in my family for as long as I can remember. (My mother skied the Haute Route in 1950.) I have poured over the vividly contrasting black and white photos of glaciers, snowfields and clouds, smelling the snow, being swept away by the high mountain vistas and dreaming about leaving my own tracks in the fresh snow along La Haute Route.

Allalinhorn

Descent de l’Allalinhorn – Don’t you love the size of their baskets?!

One of the things that I love most about Roch’s photographs is the feeling of solitude and the camaraderie of the small groups of mountaineers dependent upon each other. One also recognizes how small a human is in such a grand arena. When I finally did ski the Haute Route about 50 years after this book was published, I found that the essence of the alpine experience was very much the same as when these photos were taken – just swap out the heavy equipment, and wool clothing for super lightweight and adjustable ski gear, waterproof and breathable apparel and improved safety devices.

Colotte et Dome

Calotte et Dôme de Rochefort vus du Glacier du Mont Mallet

La Haute-Route is written in French and was published in Lausanne though I am not sure when, since there is no published date. I’m presuming sometime pre-1950. I hope you enjoy these photos as much as I do.

MonteRosa

Ascension du Monte Rosa

Take a close look at the climber’s ropes and the absence of harnesses!

ascentiondumonterosa2

Ascension du Monte Rosa

Rimpfischhorn

Rimpfischhorn & Alderpass

Map

This map is part of the inside cover – complete with coffee stains.

.

Share This Post

Tags: , , , , ,